Monday, December 12, 2016

Observations via Trout Fishing 12/5/2016


Stopped and watched the water from which my son caught his first trout nymphing last fall.  Thought about how he insisted on staying for a few more drifts.  Flipped the nymphs to the top and picked up the rod at the right time.  Toothy colored-up fall brown.  Good memory.  I didn't fish it at this moment; saved it for the walk out.  

Equisetum is a "living fossil" as it is the only living genus of the entire class Equisetopsida, which for over one hundred million years was much more diverse and dominated the understory of late Paleozoic forests. Some Equisetopsida were large trees reaching to 30 meters tall. The genus Calamites of the family Calamitaceae, for example, is abundant in coal deposits from the Carboniferous period. The name Equisetum derives from the Latin equus ("horse") + seta ("bristle").  -Wikipedia
Brown trout.


Always fish here.  Casting streamer, quartering up and across.  

Appeared to me that he was running out of the WMA into the park; made it across the river on a heavy trail; set down on the far bank and died.

Always fish here too.  I tracked the numbers closely comparing black streamer and nymphs.

Money water.  The gray.

Venison never subjected to any cooking heat.  Packed in salt keg one week.  Smoked for maybe six hours. 

And this big bull of the woods.  Big-bodied.  Died just inside park boundary.  Antlers cut off at base with a saw.  Otherwise left intact.

Turns out the black streamer beat nymphing with ratio of 3:2 i.e.  twelve to eight total count.  Not a single fish greater than twelve inches.  Nearly all in the range of 9-12 inches.  Couple small fish including one that must have hatched 2015.

Cut off my fly and walked the floodplain into WMA.  Found this one.  Another big body.  Head and neck gone, clean saw cut evident near base of neck.  Can't say for sure what happened to these two deer but seems two general/main possibilities: (1) shot and tracked to deathbeds, trophies taken and bodies left, or (2) shot a great distance away, not found by hunters; later found and antlers/heads then taken.  Hate to think the worst, but it kind of felt like #1 because (a) this place has big walls - would be really tough to get a deer out of here; yet it crawls with hunters; unsure how they get them out; must quarter and pack out, (b) both deer in wide open, obvious lays, (c) if someone other than hunter cut off antlers/head, he/she would have likely had to find the deer, walk out and return with a saw.  Seems unlikely.  But certainly possible  Will never confirm anything; story won't be told.  Whatever the case, tough to see them laying as such.  Reported to CO, who appreciated the info and pictures.  Minnesota does have laws against wanton waste that apply to both hunting and fishing.  

Scrapes everywhere on the floodplain trails.


Big walls on all sides.

Some of the majesty.

Pink annelid caught my eye on way out: linear color in the drab.

4 Comments:

Anonymous piscator fontinalis said...

Great day afield. lots to muse upon. pull of trout the fine bonus. love the snow dust.
Thanks for kind words on my deer hunt. Much more to tell.

6:40 PM  
Blogger Wendy Berrell said...

Boots on the ground has been the mantra. See what you can see.

8:59 PM  
Blogger tomm steave said...

Superb way of explaining, and great blog to get wonderful information.

Robert

4:00 AM  
Blogger custom writing service said...

amazing fishing pics and content! seeing this makes me want to go right now, but sad i have school tomorrow. i enjoy your blog and will send the link to my friends too.

5:01 PM  

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